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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Rex Holman added to this discussion on May 29, 2011

I recently made a trip up to Akron to visit former OSU wrestler, Walsh Jesuit standout and friend, Scott Overholt. My expectation was to receive some further kettlebell training and pick up a thing or two.

My expectation was far exceeded.

Let me back track and explain a little of my fascination and occupation with kettlebells. I had seen blips about them in magazines for the past few years and pretty much dismissed or avoided another attempt at marketers trying to grab my attention. I have been around the block a couple of times and have used most every exercise tool known to man, which left me opinionated and a little pessimistic to any new entry in the market.

I am a Fireman and a Paramedic at this stage of my life. I work for Upper Arlington which is the city in which I grew up. The little building on Reed Rd known as Station 72 was razed recently and in its’ place was erected a Castle which houses Fire, Police and some Administrative Staff.

In the dungeon of that castle is a beautiful weight room with wonderful equipment and space. In that space lie kettlebells which spontaneously appeared upon the integration of Police and Fire into the same building. At that point, the seed was planted in some fertile dirt. Hmmm. Alright, I will give these things a chance and with no established technique or form, I proceeded to play with my new toy.

These things were cool and challenged me differently than other devices. It was odd as I had to stay keenly aware of what I was doing. It wholly engaged my attendance unlike other simpler tools. What I was realizing is that my new toy required a substantial amount of skill to utilize and it would afford me strength gains yet unrealized. This new device was capturing my imagination much like wrestling did when I was 10 years old. A lightbulb went on and my intuition was that THE KETTLEBELL IS A GAMECHANGER.

So, I delved into the information out there. I went for the basics, Kettlebells for Dummies and anything that popped up on a google search. At this time, I was aware that Scott Overholt was working as a fitness professional that had a background in Kettlebell. I was watching the videos on his site and was captivated by what I was seeing in terms of strength and athleticism of exercises.

In November, one of our Police Officers, Greg Ellifritz, put on a Kettlebell class for the Firefighters at my request. Greg is the resident badass cop, who is Department’s training officer. Greg knows strength training and Police work. The class was great and further stoked my fire.

Fast forward six months. I have been working with Kettlebells ever since and my infatuation with them has turned into a love interest. I love kettlebells. There I said it. But like any relationship, it grows a little stale unless you innovate and continue to grow it. I need continuous information and ideas on how to progress with the kettlebell. What I need is further instruction and expert opinion.

Enter Scott Overholt. Scott=Kettlebell expert. He has devoted himself to being a true fitness professional with expertise in kettlebells. He lives the lifestyle. His Scott Overholt Strength FB page is a constant source of information and motivation. So, for me to say I was looking forward to a training session with him was an understatement.

My dad made the trip with me. We met Scott at his gym along with Josh Zupancic, 2xAA @ Stanford and CSU Asst. Coach, and after the formalities pretty much went right to learning. What followed was philosophy, structure and reason steeped in experience.

The warm up we did was comprehensive and intelligent. As I look at my notes, I see no less than 5 stretches that I plan on incorporating into my warm up routine. Each movement had an explanation and a purpose of which was multifaceted.

We stuck to the basic kettlebell movements and Scott offered technical advice as well minor adjustments of detail.

Again referring to my notes, I see an adjustment that I will implement with regard to the clean and I will be incorporating the Figure 8 and side swing after receiving additional instruction from Scott on their correct execution.

The information that he provided to me is invaluable. Every so often, I get that gut feeling that something is very important and true. This is how I felt about the instruction I received.
Anyway, after about two hours I was worn out and had processed as much as I could. It was time to call it a day.

Scott is a smart guy that has the philosophy of learning from the best and evaluating training ideas based upon real world results. Scott is the guy I wish that I had in high school, college and post college providing me the information I needed about strength training and fitness. If I were up in Akron or a close by vicinity, I would be training there.

I feel that Scott Overholt can make a huge difference in your level of fitness, but even moreso for aspiring wrestlers with a solid work ethic.



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Patrick Campbell added to this discussion on May 29, 2011

You are STILL an animal Rex! I'd drive the 15 minutes for that workout...if I had a death wish ;) I am glad to hear it continues to work well for you!



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Mark Niemann added to this discussion on May 29, 2011

Rex, seriously... Write a book. The topic: Your passions and musings. I'd buy it twice in order to read it more!

Terrific read!


...I smell a shirt... I heart kettle bells!



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Patrick Campbell added to this discussion on May 29, 2011

Quote from Mark Niemann's post:

"Rex, seriously... Write a book. The topic: Your passions and musings. I'd buy it twice in order to read it more!

Terrific read!


...I smell a shirt... I heart kettle bells!"



He ain't kidding either. Rex already has 2 (count 'em) 2 restraining orders against Mark :-D



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Rex Holman added to this discussion on May 29, 2011

Patrick and Mark- I feel indebted whenever someone helps me and do my best to do right by that person. The trip yesterday was planned over a month in advance and usually the furthest I venture outside of I270 is a couple miles. So, this was my version of a road trip.

Scott put on an outstanding clinic for us. There was so much good information offered up. I can tell right away when someone has an eye for thoughtful detail and he has it.

As for the kettlebell, it is an extremely versatile tool which can address everything a wrestler needs in terms of strength and conditioning.

I grew up in the era where all strength coaches had a powerlifting background. So, every program was influenced by powerlifting emphasis and popular thought of the time. I did not agree with it then but abided by it and it can serve to make me angry now.

My dad was happy yesterday and ecstatic today. He loved the instruction and said his body felt great. I was a little worried for him as he did a lot of different exercises and stretches outside of daily scope. Dad is 68 y/o fitness enthusiast who still loves to learn. He was going to buy his second kettlebell today online as his experience yesterday influenced him so positively.

Great instruction is not always easy to come by. You have to have a coach that cares, does not let his ego get in the way and has your best interest in mind. Scott fulfills all those traits.

I suspect kettlebells will be the quintessential tool for wrestlers strength in the years to come.

As for me, I have some elbow issues and cannot do some lifts anymore with a bar, however, I can do the snatches, cleans and high pulls with a kettlebell. My flexibility in my hips and hamstrings has improved dramatically in the last six months, Plus, I picked up some great stretches yesterday which will add to that flexibility. I know what Scott means when he says that he has just scratched the surface of what is possible with the kettlebell.

Take care guys.



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

About 3 years ago, my then asst. coach, Alan Hiltibran, donated his coaching $ to get the team kettlebells. We added more the following year. During that time, my resident fitness guru, Dave Reese (a police officer and all-around physical freak), began developing kettlebell routines. We took alot off youtube and have found Steve Cotter to be most helpful.

Fast forward to current time, we now have incorporated tires, slosh bars (awesome tool), and a "matrix" into our workouts. Kids "love" the workouts.



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Patrick Campbell added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Quote from Brady Hiatt's post:

"About 3 years ago, my then asst. coach, Alan Hiltibran, donated his coaching $ to get the team kettlebells. We added more the following year. During that time, my resident fitness guru, Dave Reese (a police officer and all-around physical freak), began developing kettlebell routines. We took alot off youtube and have found Steve Cotter to be most helpful.

Fast forward to current time, we now have incorporated tires, slosh bars (awesome tool), and a "matrix" into our workouts. Kids "love" the workouts."



Thanks for sharing a practical application of these work-outs with a HS team Brady. You know I'm your biggest fan, but seriously dude...your going to screw around and develop a state championship team in our small town if you keep it up!



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Scott Overholt added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Rex, thanks for the positive feed back, I just wanted to expand on a few thing. But first, Patrick, why would you assume that training with me is "a death wish" - this is a common misconception that in order for training to be effective it must be intense. That's simply not the case- I overheard someone tell my son "every time you train you should feel like you got hit by a truck." This guy was way over weight btw, but why would anyone want to do something that made them feel that way? Further more are you going to stick with that or even go back to it again. The fact is when a coach lacks understanding, education, knowledge and personal experience they dazzle you with intensity. It takes very little skill to make someone tired. My style is all about building people up, making them feel better than before they came in- perpetual progression if you will. It's common for coaches to visit youtube to get the puker, physical busy work exercise of the day without even trying it them selves- receiving no feedback- so they have little understanding of what's good / bad or even why they are doing the exercise or if it's even being done correctly. I teach people technique variations that are suitable for the goal they are trying to achieve.

Here are the reasons why I feel KB's are the best tool for training for wrestling.

Strength endurance (when performed, programed and coached properly) esp though the hands, grip, lower back, glutes, hams, quads, abs- you can mimic the time and mental state of a wrestling match very easily with KBs

Non or low impact cardiovascular endurance. You can increase your work capacity without even moving your feet- saving your knees and joints- even building them up

Rotational strength- increases endurance in postural muscular system- which kicks in when the prime movers fatigue

Explosive level changes- especially through the hips and core.

Structural integrity- you wrestle with your body as one unit- you should train it that way.



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Patrick Campbell added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Quote from Scott Overholt's post:

"But first, Patrick, why would you assume that training with me is "a death wish" - this is a common misconception that in order for training to be effective it must be intense. That's simply not the case- I overheard someone tell my son "every time you train you should feel like you got hit by a truck." This guy was way over weight btw, but why would anyone want to do something that made them feel that way? Further more are you going to stick with that or even go back to it again. The fact is when a coach lacks understanding, education, knowledge and personal experience they dazzle you with intensity. It takes very little skill to make someone tired. My style is all about building people up, making them feel better than before they came in- perpetual progression if you will. It's common for coaches to visit youtube to get the puker, physical busy work exercise of the day without even trying it them selves- receiving no feedback- so they have little understanding of what's good / bad or even why they are doing the exercise or if it's even being done correctly. I teach people technique variations that are suitable for the goal they are trying to achieve.

Here are the reasons why I feel KB's are the best tool for training for wrestling.

Strength endurance (when performed, programed and coached properly) esp though the hands, grip, lower back, glutes, hams, quads, abs- you can mimic the time and mental state of a wrestling match very easily with KBs

Non or low impact cardiovascular endurance. You can increase your work capacity without even moving your feet- saving your knees and joints- even building them up

Rotational strength- increases endurance in postural muscular system- which kicks in when the prime movers fatigue

Explosive level changes- especially through the hips and core.

Structural integrity- you wrestle with your body as one unit- you should train it that way."



Hey Scott! It was not a reflection on your training program, but rather a reflection on my body...that could no longer possibly be mistaken with that of a college wrestler. I'll commit this to you. I am finishing the sale of my practice and will become an employee as of July 1st (which is happening because I'm tired of being a slave to medicine). I will be going to Alaska in August for a well deserved fly fishing trip. I'm in Medina, so starting on September 1st I will come over and let you aid me in getting my fittness back. I need it and you are obviously the man!

Post your contact info or shoot me a PM or email. I'll get in touch with you soon to get the process started.

Patrick



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Quote from Patrick Campbell's post:

"

Quote from Brady Hiatt's post:

"About 3 years ago, my then asst. coach, Alan Hiltibran, donated his coaching $ to get the team kettlebells. We added more the following year. During that time, my resident fitness guru, Dave Reese (a police officer and all-around physical freak), began developing kettlebell routines. We took alot off youtube and have found Steve Cotter to be most helpful.

Fast forward to current time, we now have incorporated tires, slosh bars (awesome tool), and a "matrix" into our workouts. Kids "love" the workouts."



Thanks for sharing a practical application of these work-outs with a HS team Brady. You know I'm your biggest fan, but seriously dude...your going to screw around and develop a state championship team in our small town if you keep it up!"



Shhhh, I'm keeping that desire a secret. :)



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Quote from Scott Overholt's post:

"The fact is when a coach lacks understanding, education, knowledge and personal experience they dazzle you with intensity. It takes very little skill to make someone tired. ... It's common for coaches to visit youtube to get the puker, physical busy work exercise of the day without even trying it them selves- receiving no feedback- so they have little understanding of what's good / bad or even why they are doing the exercise or if it's even being done correctly."



Absolutely correct. I've seen programs (wrestling and lifting) that have the "dazzle with intensity" philosophy and with the dazzle usually comes some fizzle at the end.

Never understood why coaches don't try the workouts themselves. We've seen some workouts on youtube, did them ourselves, and pitched them as they didn't accomplish what we wanted -- and others that we've had to modify to get the results we desired.



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Quote from Patrick Campbell's post:

"

Quote from Brady Hiatt's post:

"About 3 years ago, my then asst. coach, Alan Hiltibran, donated his coaching $ to get the team kettlebells. We added more the following year. During that time, my resident fitness guru, Dave Reese (a police officer and all-around physical freak), began developing kettlebell routines. We took alot off youtube and have found Steve Cotter to be most helpful.

Fast forward to current time, we now have incorporated tires, slosh bars (awesome tool), and a "matrix" into our workouts. Kids "love" the workouts."



Thanks for sharing a practical application of these work-outs with a HS team Brady. You know I'm your biggest fan, but seriously dude...your going to screw around and develop a state championship team in our small town if you keep it up!"



Shhhh, I'm keeping that desire a secret. :)



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Patrick Campbell added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Quote from Brady Hiatt's post:

"
Shhhh, I'm keeping that desire a secret. :)"



Kind of like that unranked 112 lb state champ a couple or years ago and an unpredicted 5th place finish in the team standings this past season? I love how you fly under the radar and then smack them with 5 between the eyes at the end of the season. Keep it up!



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Quote from Patrick Campbell's post:

"

Quote from Brady Hiatt's post:

"
Shhhh, I'm keeping that desire a secret. :)"



Kind of like that unranked 112 lb state champ a couple or years ago and an unpredicted 5th place finish in the team standings this past season? I love how you fly under the radar and then smack them with 5 between the eyes at the end of the season. Keep it up!"



Thanks for the well wishes and good memories -- but the unpredicted 5th place finish was only unpredicted by those outside our program. At the beginning of the year, I told the team we could finish in top 4 (Burns beating Orrill pushed Edison past us). Losing Rodgers loses big points for us so we'll need some guys to step up big for use to "screw up and win" as you put it.



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Discussion Topic: My training day at Scott Overholt”s Gym
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on May 30, 2011

Question for Scott,

I coach at Mechanicsburg (way south of you) and for a very small school (in an even smaller, one stop light town) we have some good tools at our disposal. Do you have a favorite kettle bell exercise to recomend for me to implement for my team?



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