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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Hank Kornblut added to this discussion on October 9, 2017

Didn't see it live but am watching some of it now. Heinselman v McHenry was an amazing match. I am much more excited about Heinselman after seeing him in this event. He's noticeably bigger and stronger than last summer. He is going to be really good by the time he arrives.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Hank Kornblut added to this discussion on October 9, 2017

Buck recruit Hoffman edges Beard. Impressive. Beard is really good. Hoffman scored early and seemed to be running out of gas. But he countered really well with the match on the line and won it as a result.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Hank Kornblut added to this discussion on October 10, 2017

Carr defeatedr Joe Lee with a nice tilt to ice it. But the more impressive Lee IMO is the smaller--and uncommitted--Brayton. I thought he was one of the best competitors in the entire event.

Sammy Sasso won a revenge match over Artalona (artalona beat him in finals of Fargo). I like Sasso but I won't lose sleep if he doesn't come to tOSU. He's excellent but no more so than plenty of other kids. I'd rather have Carr for sure...and I'd rather have Brayton Lee if there's any shot at getting him.

Two of the more interesting wrestlers to watch were Pat Glory (I believe he replaced Decatur) and Jacori Teemer. Both love to counter and make opponents miserable with their styles.

I was also impressed by Mitch Moore in a losing effort against Teemer. Moore is a quintessential folkstyle wrestler and likely to have a very good college career. I don't know if he'll ever win an NCAA title but I think he'll be a multiple AA--possibly a 4 timer.

Best wrestler in the entire event might be 2x world champ Kurt McHenry. He's brilliant and his match with Heinselman was worth well more than the $20 I spend monthly on Flo. McHenry is from the best wrestling state in the country--Maryland (Helen Maroulis/Kyle Snyder--end of argument). Kyle Snyder needs to bring him to Columbus. I think he's 6 years old so there shouldn't be any conflict with having Heinselman already in the room.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on October 10, 2017

Heinselman v McHenry

Why guys who are winning - with little time left on the clock (15 seconds or less) still hustle back to the center and get on the line first is a mystery to me. If you are in Heinselman's situation, you MAKE McHenry step on the line first. No rolling start that way.

I used to teach hands down, etc. until 2008 when I learned this lesson the hard way as a returning state placer on my team is winning in district semi's by one over eventual runner-up. Rolling start to ankle pick. My guy loses. Loses next match to another returning placer and no repeat trip to the Schott. Since that day, I teach don't put foot on the line until your opponent does.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on October 10, 2017

Quote from Hank Kornblut's post:

"Two of the more interesting wrestlers to watch were Pat Glory (I believe he replaced Decatur) and Jacori Teemer. Both love to counter and make opponents miserable with their styles."



Glory going to Princeton. If he had some athletic ability and some brains he could have been somebody. :)

Teemer will be an interesting transition into college. Those guys can finish so much better than his current opposition. Will be fun to watch these more funky/unique HS kids make that next step.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Hank Kornblut added to this discussion on October 10, 2017

Brady--Your comments make sense but it's an exhibition and FLO is encouraging action. Plus McHenry blurs the space/time continuum given the fact he's slightly quicker than speed of light. The reffing was a bit iffy in some matches as some obvious stalling went uncalled.

As for wrestlers being able to finish better at the next level---well, yes. But most of the guys at this event are collegiate level right now. Some are ready to AA--right now.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Jason L. Jackson added to this discussion on October 10, 2017

Would have like to have seen 3 point takedowns for this event. Flo (and others) are always pushing for that, so make it a reality in your exhibition.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Michael Rodriguez added to this discussion on October 11, 2017

I’m a takedown guy. I’m a takedown coach. I lived by it and (as it turned out) died by it. I still recognize that mat wrestling is part of the sport. I like the escape point. I like that takedowns are two. I don’t want to live in a world where crowds of biased fans are yelling “three!” If you’re gonna be one dementional, then you have to pay the price. If you can hold him down, then hold him down. A three point takedown de-values Logan Stieber and Jim Jordan. It devalues J. Jaggers and Dean Heil. Folkstyle wrestling is folkstyle wrestling is folkstyle wrestling. Love it for what it is.

For the record, I don’t like the four point near fall either. It wasn’t broken, it didn’t need fixing. That’s not to say I’m not for improvements. I’d love a push-out rule. That shit works.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Jared Ball added to this discussion on October 13, 2017

Hank. McHenry is a junior and was giving up ten lbs to Hienselman, even more impressive is that he recorded three takedowns to one against him. The only reason he hasn't been snatched up yet is that he weighs 105lbs soaking wet. Even with a redshirt you have to wonder weather he fills out a 125 singlet. I personally think with a talent like him out there he'll get snatched up sooner than later. Why haven't we seen he younger Decatur competing in some of these freestyle events? Was he at Fargo?



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Michael Rodriguez added to this discussion on October 13, 2017

Last year and this summer, there was much talk about Spencer Lee's size and his ability to perform at his high level at 125 at the DI level. Spencer Lee has 15 pounds on McHenry, if not more.

I tend to believe that great talent and skill find their way to success. Now, It might not be NCAA champion success (even though they might have NCAA championship talent). I look at a guy like Erik Burnett. A dominant 4X state champion in high school, he ended up at Clarion. I love Clarion (or at least I did when I was young), but tell me why Ohio State didn't recruit this kid? I digress.

Anyway, He was an incredibly skilled wrestler. I'm shocked zero by his successes in coaching. He was also a gifted athlete. He was just small for the weight...and it was 118 back then. HE had a nice career and ended up an All American. I feel like McHenry can absolutely do that. That's his floor not his ceiling.

Remember, at this age, David Taylor was a scrawny 112-pounder and now he battles the best 190-pounders in the world.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Brady Hiatt added to this discussion on October 13, 2017

Quote from Michael Rodriguez's post:

"Remember, at this age, David Taylor was a scrawny 112-pounder and now he battles the best 190-pounders in the world."



We all knew it was a matter of time before D.T. got large because D.T.'s dad is a tall man. To make an educated guess at McHenry's eventual size, take a look at dad & mom. I've never seen them -- has anyone on Dot.Net?



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Michael Rodriguez added to this discussion on October 13, 2017

Brady...Good call. I assume he’ll stay small, but if you pack on Tomasello style muscle he could be an average sized 125-pounder. Now, not everyone can put on that kind of good weight. I mentioned Burnett earlier as a success, I also remember the great David Range. Ridiculous athlete, great wrestler, awesome guy, too small to compete at the Big Ten level at 118. I hope McHenry grows into the weight. He’s a gifted wrestler, creative and dynamic. I’d like to see him compete at the NCAA level.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Jeff Streu added to this discussion on October 16, 2017

All this talk of certain guys being too light for the lightest college class has me wondering, what is the ideal candidate/body type if you're trying to find a career 125 lb'er? By career 125, I mean one who can "comfortably" cut to 125 for four or five years (if redshirting) - not a scenario like Tomasello where he's reluctantly dropping from 133 to help the team.

Certainly the weigh-in procedures are different now than when Erik Burnett wrestled, but he wrestled 112 his last two years of high school and then wrestled 118 in college. How undersized could he have been? With the different weight classes back then, that would be similar to a 120 lb'er wrestling 125 in college today, which happens all the time.

Obviously everyone grows at different rates and has different genes, and it's not always easy to predict. We've all seen guys who finished HS at 120 (or 119) and were a full 141 by the end of college, and we've also seen guys like Joey Dance who finished HS at 126 and then wrestled all four years at 125.

I personally think that a HS senior wrestling at 113 or 120 is an ideal candidate if you're looking to fill 125 for four years. For many 18 year olds of that size, it's not too hard to pack on extra muscle if one thinks they'll be too small for college.

Sorry; didn't mean to stray too far off the original topic, but am curious to hear opinions on this.



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Discussion Topic: Who's Number One?
Jeff Streu added to this discussion on October 16, 2017

Also, cutting weight nowadays is, in my opinion, overrated. With the short time after weigh-ins, "you weigh what you weigh." I once read that the average DI 125 pounder walks around at 140. That either means: a) they are fat in the off-season and slim down in the fall, or b) they are a lean 140 and are cutting 15 lbs each week and losing any perceived strength advantage.

What a lot of wrestlers don't understand is that it takes at least as long to rehydrate as it took you to dehydrate. For example, if you dropped 10 pounds over the course of X number of days, you won't be able to rehydrate/refuel to the same strength level in the two hour span between weigh-in and match time. Sure, you could chug 10 lbs of liquids, but most of it will just sit in your gut for that window of time.



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